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Gauge rule (2 of 2)

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probably made in London

Gauge rule (2 of 2)
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This excise officer's gauge rule was made around 1790, probably by Edward Roberts of Old Jewry in London. It is made of wood. The design is a modified version of Thomas Everard's sliding rule proposed by Charles Leadbetter in 1750.

The upper face in the picture is used for calculating square and cube roots, for gauging the volume of all sorts of casks, and for measuring round bodies, such as timber. The edge of the rule is used for reducing to a cylinder casks which are spheroid, parabolic or parabolic conoid.

In brewing and distilling, it was necessary for excise officers to work out the tax due from the volume of barley malted and from amounts of liquor held in casks. Calculation of the total and partial content (or ullage) of casks was aided by specially designed slide rules such as this one.

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