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Coin (obverse), Denarius, of Lucius Plautius Plancus

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minted in Rome

Coin (obverse), Denarius, of Lucius Plautius Plancus
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This silver coin was minted in Rome by Lucius Plautius Plancus in 47 BC. It is a type called a denarius, the most common Roman silver coin. This picture shows the obverse of the coin.

The obverse depicts Medusa, a monster in Greek and Roman mythology who could turn anyone who looked at her into stone. She has a coiled snake on either side; the letter T was later punched on her face. The legend 'L.PLAVTIVS' below refers to the moneyer.

Some Roman coins had symbols or letters punched onto them, but the purpose of these so-called 'bankers' marks' is uncertain. They may have been marks indicating correct weight and alloy after inspection, or perhaps the opposite, marks of rejection.

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